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Archive Memory

Intermedia Exhibition Features Paintings of Boxes

JACKSONVILLE, FL – From October 6 – October 26 Jacksonville University’s Alexander Brest Museum and Gallery presents Archive Memory, an exhibition by Washington state artist Joe Hedges. The exhibition will be on view October 6-26 with an opening reception Thursday, October 6 from 5-7 PM

The exhibition will showcase Hedges’ paintings, sculptures, a video and a website that feature stacks of metal storage and file boxes scattered in floating configurations that defy physics. Lending further strangeness to the paintings are interruptions of abstract paint drips resembling digital glitches, areas of translucency and thick and thin passages of color. According to Hedges, “the works explore changing notions of archive space and memory in a digitally mediated world.”

Over the last few years, part of Hedges process involves feeding images of paintings into a website of his creation, mintabox.com.  On the site, visitors are then asked to make contributions, resulting in an ever-evolving online composition, effectively becoming a crowd-sourced digital painting.  Hedges then uses the website to inform new paintings in a physical-digital loop. 

In addition to the paintings, installations and website is an eight-minute art film entitled A Curious Inventory (https://vimeo.com/142172663), created with Hedges’ partner and occasional creative collaborator Jiemei Lin. 

Joe Hedges earned a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). He now works at Washington State University in Pullman, WA as Assistant Professor of Painting/Intermedia. Hedges has exhibited nationally and internationally, most recently in the CICA (Czong Institute for Contemporary Art) Museum in Korea, and a two-person exhibition in 798 arts district in Beijing, China.

The Alexander Brest Museum and Gallery is located in the Phillips Fine Arts Building on the campus of Jacksonville University. Named for its primary benefactor, the facility maintains a permanent collection as well as a rotating schedule of contemporary exhibitions, providing a professional arts resource for emerging student and established artists.  Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Joe Hedges: Archive Memory
October 6-26, 2016
Opening reception October 6 from 5-7pm
Free and open to the public

Alexander Brest Gallery
Jacksonville University
2800 University Blvd N
Jacksonville, FL 32211

Joe Hedges

oil on canvas

 

Joe Hedges - Archive Memory solo exhibition at Alexander Brest Gallery Joe Hedges - Archive Memory solo exhibition at Alexander Brest Gallery Joe Hedges - Archive Memory solo exhibition at Alexander Brest Gallery Joe Hedges - Archive Memory solo exhibition at Alexander Brest Gallery

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Upcoming Exhibition: Archive Memory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

From October 6 – October 26 Jacksonville University’s Alexander Brest Museum and Gallery will present Archive Memory, an exhibition by Washington state artist Joe Hedges.

Joe Hedges - Disheveled, Alkyd on Canvas

Joe Hedges – Disheveled, Alkyd on Canvas

Archives in the twenty-first century exist in both the dusty basements of bureaucracies and in the flickering personal no-spaces of the internet. Joe Hedges’ gravity-defying configurations of file boxes float in a layered simulacra of intermedia approaches from painting, installation, internet art and video.

Representations of boxes are interrupted by abstract paint drips or digital glitches, serving as reminders of the changing nature of archive space and memory in a digitally mediated world.

The exhibition will showcase Hedges’ paintings and sculptures that feature stacks of metal storage boxes. In addition to these physical works are two digital pieces: an eight-minute video art piece entitled A Curious Inventory, and documentation of mintabox.com, an ever- changing work of participatory internet art. The exhibition will be on view October 6-26 with an opening reception Thursday, October 6 from 5-7 PM

Mintabox.com

Mintabox.com

A Curious Inventory short film - screen shot

A Curious Inventory short film – screen shot

Joe Hedges - A Curious Inventory installation view, The Art Academy of Cincinnati

Joe Hedges – A Curious Inventory installation view

 

Joe Hedges earned a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). He now works at Washington State University in Pullman, WA as Assistant Professor of Painting/Intermedia. Hedges has exhibited nationally and internationally, most recently in Gimpo, Korea; Cagliari, Italy; and Beijing, China.

The Alexander Brest Museum and Gallery is located in the Phillips Fine Arts Building on the campus of Jacksonville University. Named for its primary benefactor, the facility maintains a permanent collection as well as a rotating schedule of contemporary exhibitions, providing a professional arts resource for emerging student and established artists. Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Alexander Brest Gallery
Jacksonville University
2800 University Blvd N
Jacksonville, FL 32211

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Roswell Museum and Art Center

Roswell Museum and Art Center, new media exhibition as part of New Media New Mexico. Photo from Sara Woodbury

Roswell Museum and Art Center, new media exhibition as part of New Media New Mexico (my piece in the center, essentially a computer with wallpaper). Photo from curator Sara Woodbury

New Media New Mexico Trail

New Media New Mexico Trail

I currently have a piece on display at the Roswell Museum and Art Center in Roswell, NM as part of a group new media exhibition.  The exhibition in Roswell is also part of a larger event,  New Media New Mexico Trail, that includes work from artists around the world in a variety of institutions in the state of New Mexico.  The event is organized by Currents, an international festival of new media art that takes place in Santa Fe.  Last year I had a piece in the Santa Fe festival.  This year when I saw the call for pieces that were subtly “sci-fi” I thought it might be a good fit.

While I don’t identify primarily as a new media artist, I do think contemporary technologies are particularly well-suited to address contemporary issues.  My piece, nmnmnmnmnm.com is about the museum experience itself.  I relied on Google street view technology and photographs from the internet to create an Internet-based interactive installation that was about the museum, despite not having been there in person. Creating the work this way was itself a commentary on the physical vs. digital experience of place.  Displayed on a wall-mounted screen is an image of a nondescript stretch of road in New Mexico.  Above the road exploded pieces of the Roswell Museum & Art Center hover supernaturally in as an unsolvable 3D puzzle. The individual components can be moved by clicking and dragging with a mouse.  Additional pages play with pieces from the museum’s permanent collection, and the whole piece is framed by corrugated metal wallpaper, again representing the tension between simulacra and reality.

nmnmnmnmnm.com - New Media New Mexico piece

nmnmnmnmnm.com – New Media New Mexico piece

Last weekend I finally visited the town of Roswell and the Roswell Museum and Art Center.   The Roswell Museum and Art Center has an amazing permanent collection of Native art, a collection of some of the world’s first liquid fuel rockets built by engineer Robert H. Goddard, and thankfully for me some temporary exhibitions of progressive contemporary art.  My visit and the exhibition coincided with the weekend of the International UFO Festival.  I wanted to thank curator Sara Woodbury in person, and going to Roswell on this weekend meant I also had the pleasure of meeting her in some pretty great alien face paint!

I know by now that children are most receptive to art in general, especially interactive art, so I was not surprised in watching visitors interact with the piece within the museum gallery.  Adults generally tend to be dissuaded by the challenge of confronting new things, whereas children light up:  “Hey Mom, Dad is making the museum!”  I heard a kid call out as his father fumbled with the mouse.  Adults also have strict ideas about what should and should not be in a museum, which is why I appreciate the museum’s willingness to include a piece that is essentially a computer displaying a website.

In the late nineties, the internet was still a kind of wild-west for nerds and young people who had grown up playing video games in the 1980‘s. The idea of what a website was or could be was still evolving. The full potential of the internet as a personal creative tool was never realized, or at least was never popularized or accepted. Could the internet have developed into primarily a tool of self-expression and art-making rather than a behemoth of competing corporate interests like Google and Facebook?  Perhaps all media are destined to become tools of the powerful.  For me, creating internet art as contemporary art subverts both the expectations about what a website and the internet should do, as well as expectations about what can and cannot be included in a gallery or museum.  Furthermore, using technologies like Google Street View in ways they are not intended play with our ideas about presence, experience and internet as commodified information delivery system.  Having visited the museum in person, I can say with confidence that Google Street View does not even approximate the actual experience of being in a place, particularly a place like Roswell.  Telepresence is not presence, despite the best efforts of silicon valley to sell us augmented experiences as such; the heat, the voices, the atmosphere is all missing.  Like any place, Roswell should be experienced if you have the means to travel.

From the wonderful postmodern mash-up of rocketry history and native American art on display at the Roswell Museum and Art Center, to a salon-style wall-to-ceiling warehouse sized showcase of nearly fifty years of artists in residence at the Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art, one gets the sense that compared to its population, there is a surprisingly disproportionate amount of creativity on display in Roswell, NM.  I am even forced to concede that the UFO lore the town has embraced, while not terribly convincing for an empirical rationalist like me, is extremely entertaining and creative.

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Interdisciplinary: Juried Exhibition in Boston, MA

Interdisciplinary 
Some of the most dynamic contemporary artworks marry more than one technical approach. Creative Living Works is hosting an exhibition at Washington Street gallery that challenges the traditional boundaries of art making and involves multiple mediums. National, international and local artists will be displaying work that crosses creative fields in the subject matter, the medium or a combination of both.

Transit and parking info:Free parking against the fence in the rear of the building. Near Union Square and Harvard Square.

Gallery at Washington Street
321 Washington Street
Somerville, MA 02143
(617) 623-5315
http://www.washingtonst.org/

Gallery hours:
Saturdays 12-4 or by appointment

See participating artists and vote for the People’s Choice Award here:
http://www.creativelivingworks.com/interdisciplinary/index.php

Opening Reception: January 9, 7-10 PM

Closing Reception: January 30, 7-10 PM
Featuring Live Music by The Steve GutenBAND and The Breakfast Project
On View Saturdays from January 6-30, 12- 4 PM

Not in the Boston area for the January 9th opening? No problem – we will be recording the event with a 360 camera so you can join in virtually! With a VR headset or a google cardboard and your smartphone, you can feel like you are there thanks to StreamVR. Watch the recording of the VR + Art webinar to find out more about how VR will be used: http://creativelivingworks.com/vrwebinar/

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CICA New Media Art 2016: The 2nd International Exhibition on New Media Art in South Korea

[전시] CICA 뉴 미디어 아트 2016 국제전: CICA New Media Art 2016 (2016년 1월 13일 – 3월 6일)
CICA New Media Art 2016: The 2nd International Exhibition on New Media Art

Featured Artists 참여작가:

Sarah Choo
Hans Gindlesberger
Joe Hedges
Sanja Hurem
Colby Jennings
Kang Su Jeong
Mark Kleine
Helen Koo
Liss LaFleur
Kim Miller
Sean Mullan
Elisabeth Pellathy
Joe Ren
Borja Rodríguez

Schedule 전시일정:
February 10, 2016 – February 21, 2016 (2016년 2월 10-21일) Sean Mullan, Colby Jennings, Joe Hedges

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Consilience of Art & Science: Juried Exhibition near UC Davis

Pence Gallery
212 D Street
Davis, CA 95616

(530) 758-3370
www.pencegallery.org

In collaboration with the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program and the UC Davis Centennial Colloquium

THE CONSILIENCE OF ART AND SCIENCE: A JURIED EXHIBIT
January 19 – February 28, 2016
Reception: Friday, February 12, 6-9 PM

The goals of the exhibition are to show creative work that explores the intersection between art and science; to foster communication between the arts and sciences; and to spark new ways of viewing the world and ourselves.

The dates of the exhibit are: Jan. 19-Feb. 28, 2016
The reception is Friday, Feb. 12 from 6-9 PM, with awards at 7:30 PM.

 

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Flesh & Blood: Group Exhibition of Time Based Media in Oakland, CA

Source: Aggregate Space Gallery

8 January – 6 February 2016

Aggregate Space Gallery

801 West Grand Avenue
Entrance on West Street
Oakland CA 94607
info@aggregatespace.com
Aggregate Space Gallery is pleased to present this selection of works from our third annual open call for time-based media. By choosing to forgo a themed call, a cohesive show was grown out of individual relationships between the 80+ submissions. This year, the works that stood out were surreal narrative works that each focused different aspects of family and self. Together in “Flesh and Blood”, these works form a continuity of life, from birth to death, through kindness and aggression, outlining the tragedies and joys of being alive.

Featuring works by Elizabeth M. Claffey, Kristine Diekman, Simón García-Miñaúr, Joe Hedges & Jiemei Lin, Toby Kaufmann-Buhler, Martin Lang, Desiree Moore, Jennifer Saparzadeh, and Megan Wynne.

Opening Reception
8 January 6-10pm

Second Saturday Artist Talk
9 January 11am

First Friday Event
5 February 5-8pm

Featherboard Writing Series
6 February 6pm
Check aggregatespace.com/featherboard
or contact featherboard@aggregatespace.com for more information

Gallery Hours
Saturdays 1-5pm
and by appointment

 

 

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A Curious Inventory, Solo Exhibition

Joe Hedges - A Curious Inventory installation view, The Art Academy of Cincinnati

Joe Hedges – A Curious Inventory installation view, The Art Academy of Cincinnati

A Curious Inventory
A Solo Exhibition by Joe Hedges
Curated by Dani Téllez

Childlaw Gallery
Art Academy of Cincinnati
1212 Jackson St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Exhibition runs October 4, 2015 through October 31, 2015
With a closing reception October 30th, 2015 (Final Friday)

A Curious Inventory features a new video work by myself and Jiemei Lin.  All the works in the show explore the coming obsolescence of physical media, the role of physical artifacts in the age of information, and the limits of image-making as a path to knowledge. This work is inspired by the burgeoning field of Media Archeology, a lifelong interest in boxes, collecting, the aesthetics of bureaucracy, modernist notions of the grid and the cube, and the significance of the glitch as it relates to automatic processes, chance and the expressive mark.


From the press release:

Hedges’ paintings and sculptures feature stacks of storage boxes. These physical works are presented alongside the premier of an eight-minute video piece (a collaboration with Jiemei Lin) and documentation of mintabox.com, an ever-changing work of participatory internet art established in 2012.

__________________

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is one of the smallest four-year art colleges in the country, and one of the oldest arts institutions in Cincinnati. Founded in 1869, The Art Academy is located in Cincinnati’s bustling Over-the-Rhine neighborhood downtown at 1212 Jackson St, Cincinnati, OH 45202.

Joe Hedges received his BFA from Northern Kentucky University and an MFA from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). He now works at Washington State University in Pullman, WA as Assistant Professor of Painting/Intermedia. Hedges has also taught at Miami University Hamilton, Northern Kentucky University, and worked as a lead artist and project manager with the Cincinnati-based non-profit Artworks executing public murals with teen apprentices.

Dani Téllez is currently seeking a BFA in Art History and Painting from the Art Academy of Cincinnati. She is a painter/printmaker focusing on the formal qualities of colour and texture to reach beauty. Along with her studio practice, she is involved in art historical research and curating local exhibitions.


 

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AntiPatterns

Here are some shots from a recent solos how AntiPatterns, which featured paintings, digital prints, and sculpture/installation.  A big thank you to colleague Michael Holloman, Hiromi Okumura and Reza Safavi for inviting me to show and coordingating.  Thanks especially to graduate students Laura Pregeant, Yuanwen Lin, Anna Davis, Kayleigh Lang, Hayley Black, Andre Fortes, and Stephen Cohen for the scrupulous painting, install and writing for the exhibition.  This was a fun way to introduce faculty and students at Washington State University to my work.


ANTIPATTERNS
Joe Hedges

9/03/2015-09/25/2015
Reception 09/03/2015 5pm-8pm
Gallery 2
Washington State University
Department of Fine Arts
Gallery hours 9-5 M-F


ANTIPATTERNS

AntiPatterns are corrective actions gone awry. AntiPatterns stand apart from bad solutions in that they seem like effective means of problem solving; they are nefarious, appearing reliable, even virtuous, all the while containing their own retroactions.

In the paintings, digital prints, and sculptures by Joe Hedges, we see the hybridization of natural and technological objects, united and interacting in often humorous, often contemplative ways. Hedges’ works posit that while human intervention in natural processes sometimes provide solutions to specific problems, these efforts frequently leave us worse off. But hope is not lost–what most distinguishes the AntiPattern from its cousin, bad pattern, is that within the seemingly counterproductive measures of its application is found a true, eventual solution.  Hedges’ solutions ask us to examine our embedded relationship with nature and how–but more importantly why–we meddle. Perhaps within our collective societal and ecological AntiPatterns we may still find a grain of elucidation and resolution. 

A. Fortes

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Momento/Memento

Friday night I celebrated the opening of a group exhibition, Momento/Memento at REVERSE space, a gallery in Brooklyn, New York. I showed digital paintings, and friends Jacob Lynn, Christy Wittmer, and Corrina Mehiel showed fiber works, sculptures, and photographs, respectively.

We had a nice little write up in Artfcity.com, calling the exhibition a must see event and describing my photos as possessing an “Alzheimer’s-like strangeness”

This was my first show in New York and I am happy to have shown alongside good friends from Cincinnati. Here’s an excerpt from the exhibition description:

OPENING FRIDAY, JUNE 19TH, 7 – 9PM, REVERSE will present, for the first time in New York, four Cincinnati-based artists working on the objectification of time and memory.
Consciousness is endlessly grasping for objects as moment boxes. Yet there is an important etymological distinction between our contemporary understanding of memento (commonly misspelled momento)—a French souvenir, which can take the form of anything from a cheap snow globe to an interesting rock—and memento mori, which symbolized the medieval practice of reflecting on mortality and the transient nature of the universe. It is in the gap between these two definitions of the same term that the exhibition MOMENTO / MEMENTO operates, as Joe Hedges, Jacob Lynn, Corrina Mehiel, and Christy Wittmer work to acknowledge an objectified attachment to moments in time.Photo Jun 19, 7 55 51 PM (1)

Read the entire description here: http://reversespace.org/momento-memento/

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